Show Book List

 

Celia Green

The Decline and Fall of Science

If you're looking for a book which expresses some of the failings of modern science, then Celia Green's The Decline and Fall of Science isn't it. True, there are some discussions of problems with physics and medicine, but they are the weakest part of the book. The rest of the book concerns two subjects. The first of these is Green's view on the nature of society, which is that far from helping its members to achieve their potential, its main purpose seems to be to hold them back. She makes some good points, and it's certainly entertaining to read her arguments.

The second part of the book consists of reports of paranormal and similar events which have been collected by Green's Institute for Psychophysical Research, including lucid dreams, apparitions and psychokinesis. One purpose of the book was to try to attract funding, but here I think that Green just doesn't get it - after implying that the best thing society can do for you is to leave you alone, she then hopes that someone will put large sums of money at her disposal. But she does make a good case for research in this subject, stressing results as being interesting in their own right rather than for their 'magical' aspects, and the book certainly increased my interest in the possibility of paranormal phenomena.

Amazon.com info
Hardcover 190 pages  
ISBN: 0241893941
Salesrank: 6075722
Weight:1.74 lbs
Published: 1976 Hamish Hamilton Ltd
Marketplace::Used from $5.15
Buy from Amazon.com
Amazon.co.uk info
Hardcover 190 pages  
ISBN: 0900076062
Salesrank: 1911517
Weight:0.8 lbs
Published: 1977 Institute of Psychophysical Research
Marketplace::Used from £22.25
Buy from Amazon.co.uk
Amazon.ca info
Hardcover 190 pages  
ISBN: 0900076062
Salesrank: 2757318
Weight:0.8 lbs
Published: 1977 Institute of Psychophysical Research
Marketplace::Used from CDN$ 109.89
Buy from Amazon.ca





Product Description
Inside cover: "In her latest book, The Decline and Fall of Science, Celia Green has married the brilliant and caustic style of The Human Evasion to the subject-matter of her scientific books on lucid dreams, out-of-the-body experiences and apparitions. The book is first and foremost a blistering and highly amusing attack on the attitudes of the contemporary scientific and intellectual establishment to psychical phenomena and their investigation. ('"What have lucid dreams to do with science?" they ask, in an attitude of witless openmindedness, expressive of their perfect willingness to allow you to talk yourself into exhaustion'); and it contains many highly dramatic first-hand case-histories of the kind currently ignored by science: out-of-the-body experiences, apparitions, telepathy and psychokinesis."