Peter Day

The Candle revisited

In 1860 Michael Faraday gaves the Christmas Lectures at the Royal Institution on 'The chemical history of a candle. The Candle revisited is a collection of articles based on recent talks at the Royal Institution starting with one by P.W. Atkins taking another look at the candle. The book is well illustrated and aimed at the non-specialist. If you're the sort of person who likes to read a short scientific article in your lunch hour then then you should take a look at this book.

I felt that Atkins' article on the candle tried to squeeze in too many new ideas without encouraging understanding. The next article on Painting with Atoms by R.H. Williams suffered from the same fault, but the later articles such as Robert Greenler on Sky Arcs and H.J. Evans on genetics were more interesting. Peter Day's article on superconductivity and Murdin's on supernovae would be useful for bringing the reader up to date on these subjects, but of course the subjects have moved on since the book was written in 1994. R.R. Chanelli's on Bioremediation was a bit like a research report but was still reasonably readable. John Bartlett's subject - tunneling under the channel - looked uninspiring, but his article was surprisingly interesting.

Amazon.com info
Paperback 170 pages  
ISBN: 019855835X
Salesrank: 12910628
Weight:0.7 lbs
Published: 1994 Oxford University Press
Marketplace:New from $9.95:Used from $5.16
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Amazon.co.uk info
Paperback 158 pages  
ISBN: 019855835X
Salesrank: 3516195
Weight:0.7 lbs
Published: 1994 Oxford University Press
Marketplace:New from £24.83:Used from £0.93
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Amazon.ca info
Paperback 170 pages  
ISBN: 019855835X
Salesrank: 2588658
Weight:0.7 lbs
Published: 1994 Oxford Univ Pr
Marketplace:New from CDN$ 36.96:Used from CDN$ 5.63
Buy from Amazon.ca





Product Description
This book is concise sampler of the many wonderful and insightful essays that appear in the compendium Proceedings of the Royal Institution, Volume 65. The Friday Evening Discourses of the Royal Institution, initiated by 1826, form one of the most prestigious series of science lectures in the world. Chapters include The Candle Revisited, by P.W. Atkins, Supernovae: The Death of Stars, by Paul Murdin, and Our Genes Under the Microscope, by H.J. Evans, among others. Taken together, the chapters make for fascinating reading for all readers interested in scientific discovery and technological progress. scientists, like P. W. Atkins and Peter Day, present their work at these lectures in a language accessible to a public audience and this has resulted in some of the best ever popular writing by active scientists. Topical issues covered include microbiological approaches to cleaning up oil-spills, the construction of the Channel Tunnel, and the nature of the human genome.