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Douglas Palmer

Seven Million Years

Seven Million Years by Douglas Palmer is packed full of information about the evolution of humans. As well as describing the many of the discoveries of fossil humans, Palmer explains the techniques used to make sense of these fossils, such as radioactive dating. He also looks at our similarity with other primates, especially chimpanzees, and sees what this can tell us about our origins. Later in the book Palmer examines how we came to use tools, and looks at the development of human language and society, as well as showing what genetic tests on present day humans can tell us about how we spread around the planet.

One thing I felt about this book was that it wasn't particularly good at inspiring enthusiasm for the subject in its readers. In books where the author is trying to persuade you of a particular point of view there is more of a tendency to 'get into' the arguments. This book isn't like that, its more of a straightforward overview of the facts. Palmer does manage to convey the information in a readable form though. Hence it would suit someone who already has an interest in the subject and would like to know more, without going into the technicalities.

Amazon.com info
Paperback 304 pages  
ISBN: 0753820846
Salesrank: 3988202
Weight:0.62 lbs
Published: 2007 Phoenix
Marketplace:New from $14.99:Used from $1.95
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Amazon.co.uk info
Paperback 304 pages  
ISBN: 0753820846
Salesrank: 1693101
Weight:0.62 lbs
Published: 2006 W&N
Marketplace:New from £6.14:Used from £0.01
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Amazon.ca info
Paperback 304 pages  
ISBN: 0753820846
Salesrank: 3393528
Weight:0.62 lbs
Published: 2006 Phoenix
Marketplace:New from CDN$ 35.26:Used from CDN$ 0.01
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Product Description
How did humans evolve? Why did Homo sapiens survive when others did not? Do Neanderthals deserve their reputation as hairy, unintelligent ape-men? Douglas Palmer, an acclaimed science writer and lecturer, examines one aspect of evolution that has been particularly difficult for some to accept: humanity’s common ancestry with chimpanzees and other apes. Written for the general reader, and including the most up-to-date genetic research, this fascinating study explores the archeological finds and biological research that lead to the discovery of our own species. Palmer’s look at our link to a family tree of over 20 close relatives—many now extinct—provides intriguing insights and will change our perception of what it means to be human.