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Henry Nicholls

Lonesome George

In 1971 a lone tortoise was found on the Galapagos island of Pinta. He is thought to be the last such Pinta tortoise, and in Lonesome George: The life and loves of a conservation icon Henry Nicholls tells his story. A significant theme of the book concerns attempts to get George to reproduce, with the selection of genetically similar females from other islands, but little response from George himself. Nicholls looks at what is being done and at what might be done in future to get round this problem, including more speculative options such as cloning.

Nicholls tells the reader some of the history of the Galapagos tortoises - how they might have arrived on the islands, and of their encounters with humans, including Charles Darwin on the Beagle voyage. Unfortunately contact with humans generally resulted in tortoises being killed - either for meat or as specimens for collectors. Nowadays the emphasis is on conservation, and throughout the book Nicholls give examples of conservation efforts applied to other species, some of which have been highly successful, others less so. Hence this book will provide useful information for those interested in species conservation as well as being an entertaining read.

Amazon.com info
Hardcover 256 pages  
ISBN: 1403945764
Salesrank: 2167057
Weight:0.75 lbs
Published: 2006 Palgrave Macmillan
Amazon price $11.94
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Amazon.co.uk info
Hardcover 256 pages  
ISBN: 1403945764
Salesrank: 1517494
Weight:0.75 lbs
Published: 2006 Palgrave Macmillan
Marketplace:New from £15.19:Used from £1.01
Buy from Amazon.co.uk
Amazon.ca info
Hardcover 256 pages  
ISBN: 1403945764
Salesrank: 1948178
Weight:0.75 lbs
Published: 2006 Palgrave Macmillan
Marketplace:New from CDN$ 23.46:Used from CDN$ 5.77
Buy from Amazon.ca





Product Description
Lonesome George is a 5ft long, 200lb tortoise aged between 60 and 200. In 1971 he was discovered on the remote Galapagos island of Pinta, from which tortoises had supposedly been exterminated by greedy whalers and seal hunters. He has been at the Charles Darwin Research Station on Santa Cruz island ever since, on the off-chance that scientific ingenuity will conjure up a way of reproducing him and resurrecting his species. Meanwhile a million tourists and dozens of baffled scientists have looked on as the celebrity reptile shows not a jot of interest in the female company provided. Today, Lonesome George has come to embody the mystery, complexity and fragility of the unique Galapagos archipelago. His story echoes the challenges of conservation worldwide; it is a story of Darwin, sexual dysfunction, adventure on the high seas, cloning, DNA fingerprinting and eco-tourism.