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Reviews elsewhere on the web:
Anthony Campbell
Chris Scarre
Telegraph.co.uk

Chris Stringer

Homo Britannicus

The Ancient Human Occupation of Britain project was started in 2001 with the aim of using modern methods of palaentology to find out more about the various waves of people which have occupied our islands. In Homo Britannicus Chris Stringer (the director of the project) tells the reader some of the results of this project - how it is now thought that Britain was occupied as much as 700000 years ago, but how sensitive this occupation was to the changes of climate. Chris Stringer is an experienced writer, and the book contains plenty to interest the reader - it certainly whetted my appetite to find out more about the subject.

Except that this was only after the first fifty pages or so - I found it rather hard to get into this book. It starts with a longish chapter on 19th and early 20th century palaentologists, and I feel that it would have been much better if Stringer had started immediately with the main material of the book, adding historical material where appropriate. This work is definitely in the 'coffee table book' format, and at the start I worried that this would mean that it had plenty of glossy pictures (which it does), but little of real interest. However, as I got into the book I was pleasantly surprised.

Amazon.com info
Hardcover 317 pages  
ISBN: 0713997958
Salesrank: 1504144
Weight:2.65 lbs
Published: 2006 Penguin Books Ltd
Marketplace:New from $67.50:Used from $5.06
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Amazon.co.uk info
Hardcover 319 pages  
ISBN: 0713997958
Salesrank: 412842
Weight:2.65 lbs
Published: 2006 Allen Lane
Marketplace:New from £27.75:Used from £0.01
Buy from Amazon.co.uk
Amazon.ca info
Hardcover 317 pages  
ISBN: 0713997958
Salesrank: 2623602
Weight:2.65 lbs
Published: 2006 Penguin Books Ltd
Marketplace:New from CDN$ 98.71:Used from CDN$ 7.97
Buy from Amazon.ca





Product Description
Oxbow says: Chris Stringer, a world renowned name in the field of human origins, is based at the Natural History Museum in London where he leads a team of researchers studying human origins in Britain. The findings of his Ancient Human Occupation of Britain project forms the backbone of this, the first popular book on human origins in Britain written for a non-specialist audience. Homo Britannicus is an interesting and engaging look at the when, where, how and why of the earliest colonisation of Britain, our prehistoric ancestor's way of life and why it could not be sustained. It is the story of a fluctuating climate, extreme environmental change and man's battle for survival at a time when Britain was so tropical that our ancestors lived alongside hippos, and when Britain was so cold that reindeer and mammoth roamed the land. Highly acclaimed and well worth a read.