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Gino Segre

Einstein's Refrigerator

In 1926 Albert Einstein and Leo Szilard patented a new design of refrigerator which avoided the dangers of poisonous refrigerants used in existing designs. However, Einstein's Refrigerator by Gino Segré isn't about that. Well the book does devote a couple of pages to it, but it's really a more general look at the concept of temperature and together with discussion of various scientific topics related to temperature. It contains plenty of interesting science, but it written in a non-technical way and so is a fairly easy read, even if you've had no previous experience of the subjects dealt with.

The first chapter is entitled 37 - the temperature of our bodies. The second examines the history of temperature and thermodynamics. Other chapters deal with organisms which live in extreme temperatures, the nuclear reactions at the centre of the sun, and with the Earth's climate and global warming. The final chapter looks at quantum theory, and in particular its applications to low temperature physics. If you're looking for a book which goes into one subject in depth then maybe this isn't one for you - it does jump between subjects quite a lot. However, if you're happy with that then you'll find this book an enjoyable read.

Amazon.com info
Paperback 320 pages  
ISBN: 0140290877
Salesrank: 8394893
Weight:0.4 lbs
Published: 2004 Penguin Books Ltd
Marketplace::Used from $1.47
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Amazon.co.uk info
Paperback 320 pages  
ISBN: 0140290877
Salesrank: 2120774
Weight:0.4 lbs
Published: 2004 Penguin Books Ltd
Marketplace::Used from £0.01
Buy from Amazon.co.uk
Amazon.ca info
Paperback
ISBN: 0140290877
Salesrank:
Weight:0.4 lbs
Published: Penguin Books
Marketplace::Used from CDN$ 1.75
Buy from Amazon.ca





Product Description
Physics is the Segre family business, and Gino's enthusiasm for science is very natural and infectious. This book takes the reader on a surprising tour of the cosmos, starting within the human body and ending at the limits of the universe - using the concept of temperature as a guide.