Reviews elsewhere on the web:
Popularscience.co.uk

Donald Michie and Ashwin Srinivasan

Donald Michie on machine intelligence, biology and more

In Donald Michie on machine intelligence, biology and more, Ashwin Srinivasan has compiled a collection of articles by Michie ranging from his work with Alan Turing at Bletchley Park to his comments on the invasion of Iraq in 2003.

Michie spent much of his life working on artificial intelligence, and so that takes up the largest part of the book, with articles discussing the Turing test, computer chess and robotics. Most of all, Michie thought that the way forward was to build a machine which learned, (rather than programming an AI from scratch), and he was constantly arguing for more funding for this approach. The book also includes some of Michie's work in biology in the 1950's and 60's and concludes with a selection of his writings about science in society.

The aim of this book is clearly to be something other that a collection of academic papers, but I felt that it didn't really hit the mark. The individual articles are interesting, but they don't gel together to give the sort of picture of Michie as a person which a biography would. If you're interested in the history of AI then you might give this book a try, but I wouldn't particularly recommend it otherwise.

Amazon.com info
Hardcover 352 pages  
ISBN: 0199573042
Salesrank: 4397286
Weight:1.45 lbs
Published: 2009 Oxford University Press
Amazon price $23.08
Marketplace:New from $19.00:Used from $7.19
Buy from Amazon.com
Amazon.co.uk info
Hardcover 354 pages  
ISBN: 0199573042
Salesrank: 2278977
Weight:1.45 lbs
Published: 2009 OUP Oxford
Amazon price £29.99
Marketplace:New from £6.60:Used from £0.01
Buy from Amazon.co.uk
Amazon.ca info
Hardcover 352 pages  
ISBN: 0199573042
Salesrank: 3480983
Weight:1.45 lbs
Published: 2009 Oxford University Press
Marketplace:New from CDN$ 29.51:Used from CDN$ 13.61
Buy from Amazon.ca





Product Description
Donald Michie was an extraordinary character. In a scientific career that spanned nearly 65 years, he was the pioneer in several fields including computing, mouse embryology, transplantation biology, and machine intelligence. Tragically, he died in a car crash in 2007.

Here, Ashwin Srinivasan presents a varied collection of Michie's writings, from Colossus and computers to mouse genetics and politics. Srinivasan, a computer scientist and graduate student of Donald Michie, introduces each section and brings together an engaging collection of lively essays, revealing Michie's remarkable personality and painting a picture of his life and interests.