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Derek Steinberg

Consciousness Reconnected

What is Consciousness? The idea that it is just a property of a collection of chemicals seems to leave so much out. In Consciousness Reconnected: Missing Links Between Self, Neuroscience, Psychology and the Arts Derek Steinberg explores how taking input from differing areas of knowledge might contribute to the answer.

Thinking of consciousness in terms of a little man watching a movie leads nowhere. Steinberg suggests that a much better idea is to take the whole production process for the movie - scenery, cameramen and so on - as a model of the complexity of consciousness. He looks at ideas such as attachment theory, seeing how we can understand consciousness in terms of the society we are immersed in. He also discusses how our intuitions and beliefs might have evolved. Steinberg's breadth of knowledge is impressive, but as I read the book I began to feel that he was too much affected by postmodernist ways of thought, and that this breadth of knowledge doesn't necessarily impart useful information to the reader. I found that his ideas didn't really come together into a well thought out viewpoint. So whilst you might come across some novel ideas in this book , I don't think that it contributes very much to resolving the 'hard question' of consciousness.

Amazon.com info
Paperback 232 pages  
ISBN: 1857757785
Salesrank: 7476068
Weight:0.8 lbs
Published: 2006 CRC Press
Amazon price $19.37
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Amazon.co.uk info
Paperback 232 pages  
ISBN: 1857757785
Salesrank: 1703506
Weight:0.8 lbs
Published: 2006 CRC Press
Amazon price £13.15
Marketplace:New from £13.15:Used from £9.73
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Paperback 232 pages  
ISBN: 1857757785
Salesrank:
Weight:0.8 lbs
Published: 2006 CRC Press
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Marketplace:New from CDN$ 26.80:Used from CDN$ 17.40
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Product Description
What is consciousness? The answer to this question has eluded thinkers for millennia. In modern times, scientists have struggled to find a complete answer, often hampered by the limitations of their particular specialisms. Derek Steinberg’s unique approach constructs a multi-faceted model of mind involving science and the arts, from which the sense of personal identity emerges. In a masterful tour-de-force, he establishes links between otherwise distinct or even conflicting disciplines. In this radical departure, the author argues that the arts, literature and human culture in the broadest sense make their contributions to understanding consciousness and the sense of self, though they are rarely acknowledged in mainstream debate. Rather than focusing only on what lies between the ears, Steinberg casts a wide net. He explores the connections between sciences and the humanities as he takes the debate into new areas. This book is fascinating and enlightening reading for everyone interested in human nature and the psyche, as well as for students and professionals in the fields of neuroscience, psychiatry, psychology, medicine, social science, anthropology, philosophy and the arts, for whom the book is a breakthrough in the challenge of cross-disciplinary collaboration.